Real Life?

19 May

(Click here for this post’s year-old predecessor)

My current moment of celebration has been brought to us by this fact: I graduated high school last Friday night. 

It follows then, that now I’ve been on the receiving end of a surplus of advice and/or inspiring comments. I’ve been told both that my life has finally begun and that nothing really changes after graduation (Don’t be a motivational speaker, friend). Mm, and yes, my college plans have been questioned seventy-nine times in the past three days.

But even that is not enough to bring me down at the moment. I had a blast graduating, I did so with some terribly cool people, and I am super stoked to no longer be asked what school I go to, or what I’m doing after graduation. (the spirit of the second question will still be present often, but I choose to at least appreciate the change of tense)

I am no longer a high schooler. 

This is joyous news.

But I have a mission in today’s post, one that I must not forget – the geek speech. I mentioned this topic last year, when I got super stoked about putting fandom references in my grad speech and wrote a post (linked above) about how I would let you in on it someday.

That day is here. I have linked every otherwise-unidentified reference for explanation purposes.

 _________________________________________________

*pats microphone*

First off, what a turnout!

How wild is this, huh?

All we did was complete twelve years of schooling. And now look at us. Dressed in glorified trash bags. How far we’ve come.

But where to begin on the list of people we couldn’t have done this without?

I do feel like it would be an injustice not to give a shout-out to my school curriculum, so as much as I’d like to ignore Abeka and Saxon, I do have to say thank you to Adventures in Odyssey and Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego for being the thinly-veiled education machines that made up a good chunk of the important things I learned in my school years.

And of course, I have been immeasurably blessed by the people in my life. My friends are the best, most fantastic friends I could ask for, and my family is beyond marvelous. I can not say enough good things about them, and I could not have hoped for anyone better to be raised around. My parents, especially, have been so much better to me than I deserve. I want you all to know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that you are loved. By so many, and so much, and by no one more than me – except maybe One. I thank the Lord for you daily, which leads to the next order of business – thanking the Creator who made every bit of this possible. Thank you for your strength, your wisdom, your unconditional love, and of course, for this moment. For all these bright young men and women who are ready to get down to business to defeat the tons of opposition that we may face.

After all, the protagonist of every story finds herself in a battle at some point.

And we’re all stories in the end. Just make it a good one. Cos it is, you know? It’s the best. Remember, all of our stories have already been written by the best author our universe has ever produced – or, actually, the best author that ever produced our universe. And stories are not meant only to entertain, but to teach. There are lessons in stories. The moral of the Three Bears, for instance, is never break into someone else’s house. The moral of Snow White is never eat apples. The moral of WWI is never assassinate the Archduke Ferdinand. What will our stories tell others? That’s up to us. But we really ought to make it interesting, make it inspiring. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all. And you know God does not create anything that doesn’t make some sort of glorious difference in the world. After all, no artist can resist signing his work.

The world didn’t come with any extra parts, but it didn’t come with any that were interchangeable either.

We all have something that no one else has, and that thing is exactly what the world needs, and the thing we need to give away.

In his book Mere Christianity, C. S. Lewis wrote, “If we find ourselves with a desire that nothing in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that we were made for another world.” This place is not our home. But any good houseguest knows that you should leave a place in better condition than when you first arrived in it. It’s no different here – except that you don’t usually find opposition when you try to clean a guesthouse.

The world, however, will do what it does best and tell us to do what everyone else is doing, and to stick to the status quo but the status is not quo. The world is a mess, and we just need to… school it. It is our job to educate the world, to go and make disciples. Be fishermen, be fishers of men. So we’ll beat on, boats against the current. And, I don’t know, fly casual.

Madeleine L’engle once said, fittingly, “When we were children, we used to think that when we were grown up, we would no longer be vulnerable. But to grow up is to accept vulnerability. To be alive is to be vulnerable.”

This isn’t my favorite truth to accept, but it’s definitely a pre-requisite. I don’t pretend to be grown-up now, but I know I’m on that road. I mean, all children, except one, grow up, but our pace on that journey, the way we deal with the walk, who we become along the way is all on us. And this milestone we call graduation, it means growing up far, far less than it represents it.

Regardless of age, you have always been important, you have always been something. Age just reveals the facts that always were, and experience uncovers the you that always was. Never let people look down on you because you are young. Set an example.

And if you’re ever discouraged, the world gets on your back, and you find yourself beating yourself up and saying that now would be a really good time for you to grow up – don’t ever allow yourself to be downtrodden. Growing up is an adventure, not a destination – and that’s your secret.

You’re always growing up.

Thanks for sticking with me today and for the past years.

Catch… you… later.

_______________________________________________

In closing, I just want to extend the warmest thank you to my excellent friends who used the moment after to yell out,

“No you won’t!”

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15 Responses to “Real Life?”

  1. Laurie May 19, 2014 at 8:36 am #

    I say it all the time but you are amazing! Love you girl- your fan 🙂

    • Emory May 19, 2014 at 9:17 am #

      Thank you so much, love! You are always so incredibly good to me. 🙂

  2. Merrilee G Lewis May 19, 2014 at 10:41 am #

    So proud of you! And, btw, great post 🙂

    • Emory May 19, 2014 at 10:42 am #

      D’aw, thanks Gorgeous. mwah!

  3. sarahkendray May 19, 2014 at 12:55 pm #

    I am in love with your blog! Just discovered it. Great job 🙂

    • Emory May 19, 2014 at 1:19 pm #

      Well thank you very, very much, friend!

  4. Shahrazad May 19, 2014 at 6:10 pm #

    I believe my favorite reference was the Lemony Snicket one. I love figuring out the morals of stories.

    Your speech had me turning inside out. I didn’t know whether I should behave like a normal person or not. Either way, I failed at whatever I was trying to do. Great job!

    • Emory May 20, 2014 at 9:08 am #

      Pahaha, Lemony is a wizard with morals. Thank you, love. By the way, I wanted to let you know that I was beyond delighted to open up Peter Pan the other night. Thank you so much!

  5. whogrobanite May 19, 2014 at 9:50 pm #

    That is an absolutely fantastic speech! And many congratulations to you on your graduation!!

    • Emory May 20, 2014 at 8:08 am #

      Thank you ever so much! It feels pretty lovely at the moment. 🙂

  6. The Voyager May 30, 2014 at 6:04 pm #

    I LOVE YOU I LOVE YOU I LOVE YOU I LOVE YOU

    This is quite literally the most perfect thing I have ever read in my entire life. If it were possible to give you a million jillion likes I would because this is perfect and you are perfect and it’s just all so perfect

    • Emory May 31, 2014 at 7:53 am #

      oh wow no you are the perfect one and thank you so much wow you are nice to me
      How did your graduation go? Were you able to give a speech?

      • The Voyager May 31, 2014 at 8:14 am #

        Oh my no way it’s you

        It was good!!! But nah, they only let the special salutatorian and valedictorian give speeches and apparently I’m not cool enough.

      • Emory June 1, 2014 at 11:36 am #

        Awww, yeah you are. Hey, you could have pulled a Kanye West during his speech! In any case, all of the congratulations!

      • The Voyager June 5, 2014 at 12:10 pm #

        I should have! And thanks!

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