Tag Archives: Jimmy Coates

Control

10 Jun

I’ve read (and seen, regrettably) enough Green Lantern to be fairly certain that the force of will power is strong. However, when facing down a tray of cupcakes after you’ve already had three, will power seems like the most foreign concept since first learning that vampire/human romance is a thing.

Will power and self-control get no attention. The motto of the 21st century as I’ve seen it is “Do what feels good (See also: YOLO),” and while following that advice will lead to good feelings for a period of time, chances are that in the not-so-distant future, you will feel significantly less good about consuming that fourth cupcake.

{I know this.}

For example, I’m trying to learn French right now, but unfortunately, this process requires a little bit more than just the mental capacity to remember that certain words are meant to be feminine and others masculine (Come on, France. They’re just words; there’s no need to assign them genders.). It takes me making the conscious decision to spend a few minutes on French instead of doing any number of the things that I’d rather be doing.

Which is far harder for me than it should be.

So, to be honest? This post is for me, because I need some help with this: not just with French, but with everything else that requires commitment. You can come along too, if you like.

Dear Emory,

Self-control is a God-given fruit of the spirit. that should be good enough for you. Everyone knows that a virtue doesn’t get to that status unless it’s pretty darn wonderful. When you see someone exhibiting self-control, you admire them. They do great things.

Without self-control, self-discipline, and the green force of will power, Madeleine L’engle may have given up after twenty-six publishing attempts, and I would have never read Wrinkle in Time. Walt Disney would not have created his iconic characters, stories, and movies, nor set the stage for the happiest place on earth. The Doctor would not have gone back for Wilfred. Jimmy Coates would be an eleven-year-old murderer. Jason Bourne would be the government’s puppet. Also dead. Phineas and Ferb would spend all day sitting under a tree, Tiana would never have gotten her restaurant, and Darth Vader would still be serving the Chancellor.

“Yeah, um, only two of those people are real.”

Shut up, Brain. What I’m getting at is that the virtues are real.

Self-control: n. The act of denying yourself, controlling your impulses.

No matter how much society tells you to do “what feels good,” you have to remember that your feelings do not make good decisions. If you don’t have self-control, then what are you letting control you?

Since my customary farewell would appear oddly self-serving, I shall simply say,

Good luck,

Emory

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Good Things Come To Those Who Wait

11 Apr

When I was twelve years old, I got into a strange bout of entertainment depression. I’d come to the conclusion that no books and very few movies were interesting enough to hold my attention. During that bout, somewhere in late winter, I was browsing the children’s section of my library with little hope of finding anything suitable to my frighteningly picky desires. That was when I found the book series (authored by Joe Craig) that defined my literature experience for nearly a year.

Jimmy Coates: Assassin, the first in an eight-book series about an eleven-year-old boy with a mysterious secret: he’s not human. Well, not entirely, anyway. Jimmy’s DNA can be traced back to a test tube in a laboratory. Designed with stunning intricacy, Jimmy is a mere 38% human, the other 62% genetically modified assassin, created by the British government for the British government. Jimmy is programmed to be a fully functional killer by the age of eighteen, his human thoughts to be completely swamped by the killer inside. But that killer is not who Jimmy is. Even though his powers have been activated [very] early due to unforeseen dangers, eleven-year-old Jimmy will fight against the government, even against himself if he must, to escape a destiny that he has forsaken.

And there it is. That is all I ever wanted to read for a year. I don’t think I have to explain how much of an identity crisis I had when I realized that when I grew up I only wanted to be 38% human. But that’s not what this is about. This is about patience and how it pays off.

When I finished what was published of the series (book six of eight), I was thirteen years old.

I’m sixteen years old now. No new books have come out yet.

Obviously, I’ve read different books since then – the series helped me come out of my anti-book shell. But no new Jimmy was read. Not until now. Just a little while ago I learned that the next in the series, Jimmy Coates: Blackout, is being published in June. June. This June.

I’m no longer a part of this book’s intended audience, thanks to the extra three years the waiting process provided.

I’m much too old for Jimmy now, and the crush I used to have on him has been rendered rather inappropriate.

I don’t even remember how the last book ended.

But there is no way these things are going to stop me. Come June, I’m going to enjoy the heck out of that book whether I like it or not. Twelve-year-old me would be so proud.

All this to say, friends, family, and Fangirls, waiting pays off.

So hang in there, Sherlockians. (or should I say Holmesless Network?)

Your time is coming too.