Tag Archives: Psych

Open in New Tab

11 Sep

Friends, family, fangirls:

I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but the world is full of things.

Full of them.

There is an abundance of stuff, indoors and outdoors, in people’s heads, on their tongues, hidden in places we’ll never find, and on billboards for everyone to see. It’s everywhere you look.

Therefore, focusing on just one of those things is a task whose difficulty I consistently underestimate.

Focus is harder than you would expect an unobtrusive, two-syllable word to be. And in this generation, it is even worse. I usually try to console myself by saying that of course I have problems focusing, all Half-bloods have ADHD symptoms, so why should I be any exception?

That excuse is a little more problematic that I like my excuses to be, but I take what I can get.

When I can’t focus, my brain turns into a weird Twilight Zone version of youtube. I’ve got one thing going over here, and I’m trying to pay attention to it, but there’s something in my mental sidebar I need to check out as well. So I hit “open in new tab” and try to remember to think about that next. Then I see something else I should look at. Thirty seconds later I have forty-two tabs open, and some of the audio is overlapping and I can’t find which one is making the noise and anyway the internet connection is slowing down and nothing is working anyway and then

nope.

Any semblance of concentration I had has evaporated.

Time to lie down and try to calm the brain-static.

Or

Maybe I’ll just open a new tab and browse something to settle my mind down!

Even worse: Maybe I’ll just open a new tab and browse something while I work in another window!

Public service announcement: You cannot write a speech and watch Psych at the same time. There. I just saved you two hours of poorly-written drivel and not-properly-enjoyed Psych. You’re welcome.

I don’t know about you guys, but I am a multitasker only in that I like to sing show tunes while I wash dishes. If I try anything else, especially academics-related, the only result is that I do two things poorly instead of just one.

That’s efficiency, people. Take notes. And even without the multi-tasking trap, sometimes I use other ways to trick myself into opening that new tab; such as logging onto pinterest to inspire my brain to do something creative. Adorably naive of me, I know.

As much as you might think it will, clicking through pins of TARDIS-themed shoes, Misha Collins, Great Gatsby quotes, and plant terrariums does not give a brain ideas.  It just goes,

     “Hey, this is fun. We should do nothing more often.”

“I brought you here to get inspired, brain.”

     “That so? You’re hilarious. But not as hilarious as this gif of Zachary Quinto.”

“Mm, you have a good point.” *opens gif in new tab*

I think I’ve made my point. It’s barely even the problem of procrastination – it’s distraction. And procrastination. There’s a fair amount of both, but hey, stay with me here, I’m getting to the point in the post that you read in your serious voice.

I was talking about the overabundance of stuff at the beginning of this post. It’s not just school that is affected by stuff, there’s work, there’s relationships, there’s good old fashioned life. Stuff is still there. Distractions and obstacles and hurdles made of the stuffiest stuff that stuff can be made out of.

This post is stuff.

I’m sorry, but it’s true. I’ve lured you into more stuff.

Stuff is by no means always terrible thing. There’s just a limit to how much we can handle at once. Being bogged down by a lot of good uses for your time is still being bogged down. It’s more than okay to take a break and get away from stuff.

If this post is one of the things between you and that thing you have to get done, I apologize. Hit the little X button on the top of this window and flee to somewhere where nothing has a glowing screen.

Trust me, that wakes up your brain and brings it to attention far faster than any board on Pinterest.

I’m doing okay so far. I know that focus is attainable.

If I can just stay in one tab for a while, then I’ll be fine.

Career Mapping for the Fictionally Inclined Part 2

25 Jul

In Part 1 of Career Mapping for the Fictionally Inclined, I discussed how important it is to begin thinking about what you will do with your life one day. The fictional world is full of career opportunities, and in the interest of deciding which one is best for us, I have extended the job search.

Let’s begin.

Disney Princess.

Upside: Do I have to explain the upsides of being a Disney princess? I can talk to animals, have spectacular hair, my wardrobe is superb, I can sing in public and not get weird looks, and handsome prince is often involved at some point.

Downside: My father apparently has terrible judgment when it comes to spouses. I, for one, would like to know how he went from marrying my mother, who was allegedly a perfect angel, to marrying an evil sorceress who murdered him shortly after the wedding. Come on, Dad. I’m sure there were signs. And if step-mothers are not an issue in my story, then there’s always some conflict, whether it be my social standing, my prince thinking I’m a dude, or how trapped in a tower I am.

Psychic Detective

Upside: So. many. snacks. Additionally, I am expected to do the finger-waving to make my psychic powers more convincing, and I can’t tell you how happy I would be to get paid for doing that. My job description? To catch killers, have adventures, flirt with clients, and work with my best friend. You know that’s right.

Downside: I literally lie for a living. This could get old after a while. I would be a considerable target for serial killers, and, if I’m being totally honest with myself, I would gain thirty pounds in the first week if I were allowed to have so many snack breaks.

X-Man

Upside: Mutant powers and world-saving – nuff said.

Downside: X-Men probably catch more drama than any other super-powered individual in the Marvel multiverse. Not only does every non-mutant person hate my guts, but somehow, by the end of the school year at Xavier’s, every student has about three ex-significant others. Not to mention, the chances of being driven insane and altering reality or destroying a planet are frighteningly high.

Maze Runner

Upside: Most prestigious position in the community. A Maze Runner gets exercise, respect, and the knowledge that he may one day solve the maze, free the Gladers, and maybe get some answers.

Downside: That “knowledge” I mentioned above is a bit closer to wishful thinking than a state of knowing. And I’d have to watch out for Grievers, the most terrifyingly confusing creature known to YA literature. Not cool. It’s also worth mentioning that if I run for longer than seventy-four seconds, my own body starts trying to murder me.

Gamemaker

Upside: Fabulous dress code. I could smother myself in gold powder, and not one person could question me. I could stick stickers on my face and not one person would question me. I could stitch an outfit together out of teddy bears and hand grenades and no one would question me.

Downside: The whole sending-23-kids-off-to-certain-death thing is a bit of an issue for me.

Doctor

       Wait, a doctor or the Doctor?

The Doctor.

       Of course.

Upside: Traveling through all of time and space, making friends, and saving galaxies – I could get used to this. The company vehicle has its own personality, and knows where I should go before even I do. I have no living co-workers, so no one can cramp my style. My style, by the way, would love to include wearing a vegetable or a fez.

Downside: Time is in flux, I know, but I’m sure I would still find a way to totally mess it up. I’m not a tidy crier, and I’m pretty sure I have to cry at least once a day in this occupation. The pressure of saving the universe is an intense one, and I for one would not like to see the universe under my protection. Did I mention that I have no living co-workers? Yes? Well, did I mention that that’s because I killed them?

Once again, I believe there are more fictional occupations that I missed, so feel free to give me some more ideas! And remember, when deciding which career path is best for you, be sure to factor in whether you have the right temperament, goals, and/or species to properly complement the job.

Happy hunting!

Hug Appreciation Post

25 May

It’s time you knew something about me: I like hugs.

All kinds of hugs.

Reunion hugs.

Group hugs.

Thank-goodness-you’re-here, I-nearly-died hugs.

Turns-out-you’re-actually-a-fabulous-human-being-despite-my-earlier- misgivings hugs.

(Yup. Those are totally a thing. Hugs are very eloquent if you let them be.)

Hugs are a brilliant invention.

Even the awkward ones.

They don’t even have to be between humans.

In fact, they hardly have to be proper hugs at all.

Please, consider this entire post my hug to you.

Everybody needs a hug sometimes; it’s a basic human right. So once you’re through with the world wide interweb today, go out and give a hug to someone, whether it be an attack hug, an awkward hug, or a plain and simple just-because hug.

You won’t regret it.

Well, I suppose there is a possibility that you will. Just don’t go hugging strangers.

**This blog does not endorse harassing strangers for cuddles.** 

But hey! If and when you and I meet, just remember.

A Study in Boredom

6 May

You know the feeling. It starts when you begin to feel trapped. Somehow, you’re unable to do something you want to do, or maybe there’s nothing you want to do. If you’re a writer, it feels like a much broader version of writer’s block – nothing going on in your head is working for you.

Dull. Uninteresting. Unsatisfying. Boring. And somehow, being bored is never quite as glamorous as the gentleman above makes it look.

I don’t know about the rest of you, but when I was younger, I would march out to my mom to complain about my crippling boredom, and I would promptly be assigned a chore to do. It made me wonder whether Mom was purposefully not entertaining me in order to bore me into a trap. (It’s not a bad idea, actually)

The chores did not help, but the long minutes of resentfully stuffing silverware into the kitchen drawers did set in my mind that I had better figure out how to entertain myself in the future. But when you think about it, that’s what everyone is trying to do, isn’t it? The worst thing about boredom is a feeling of uselessness. You’re not doing anything, not accomplishing anything. A desire for purpose is what pushes every man and woman towards greatness, even if that purpose is simply to make others aware of theirs, or to rid them of the boredom you are currently fleeing.

Boredom can be useful, even beneficial, so long as it inspires you to drag yourself out of it. Don’t get me wrong – I understand that inactivity can be unspeakably glorious at times. But people were not created to do nothing all the time.

And when we say that there’s nothing we can do, or even worse, nothing to do – Stop.

Come on.

Don’t be an old sponge with hair hanging off of it. [Gus]

If you’re reading this, then you’re on the internet. The internet is full of things you don’t know or haven’t seen. Go on and find one.

Now look around you. It’s even better than the internet out there. There are far more things unknown, sights unseen, feelings unfelt, and songs unsung.

“This is one corner of one country, in one continent, on one planet that’s a corner of a galaxy that’s a corner of a universe that is forever growing and shrinking and creating and destroying, and never remaining the same for a single millisecond. And there is so much, so much to see.”

~ The Doctor

The strength of your boredom has nothing on the strength of the things that there are to pull you out of your boredom.

You’ll still be bored at some point. But remember, after you’re through with that, then use boredom against itself. Turn it on its head and use it to inspire you to do something you love or to help you love others.

Be a victor.

Public Service Announcement

15 Apr

Stop this madness.

Allow me to translate one of the more reprehensible sentences for you: “yeah and I always thought spelling was important!”

doctor who facepalm photo:  giftenfacepalm.gif

I’m not bashing people who don’t spell very well. I’m relentlessly bashing people who don’t try. As the great Lemony Snicket once said,

“If people wrote as carelessly as some people speak, then adhasdh asdglaseuyt[bn[ pasdlgkhasdfasdf.”

Just remember, boys and girls, every time you tpye lkie tihs, a fairy loses her wings.

Shame on you.